Posts tagged with sayanythingtoanyoneanywhere

Gayle Cotton Has A Great Interview On ‘The Business News Daily’!

Posted on June 17, 2013 by Comments are off

Busniess News Daily

Gayle Cotton is interviewed on The Business News Daily about how businesses can prepare for global business expansion – a timely topic for growing companies!

‘Global Expansion Requires Cultural Preparation’

http://www.businessnewsdaily.com/4429-global-expansion-cultural-preparation.html

Blog: www.circlesofexcellence.com/blog

Website: www.circlesofexcellence.com

Gayle Cotton’s book website: Say Anything to Anyone Anywhere!

Coming soon on the Circles Of Excellence blog:

Article on: Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos for The PHILIPPINES

Currently on Gayle Cotton’s blog

Her article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for INDONESIA

Check out our Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

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Cultural Clues for Doing Business in Asia

Posted on April 7, 2013 by Comments are off

Asia 2Cultural Clues for Doing Business in Asia

Numerous countries and cultures often have shared characteristics that are based on the origin of their mother tongue languages, environment, climate, and ethnic background, among other things. While each Asian country certainly has its own unique culture distinctions, there are also many similarities in cultural etiquette and communication styles between the Asian/Pacific cultures as the following 21 clues identify.

1.   Many members of Asian cultures have three names, the first usually being the family name. This is important to know when addressing someone, especially in e-mail. Surnames (Mr., Ms., or the equivalent in the language of the culture) are still frequently used some cultures.

2.   Handshaking is common and is often accompanied by a slight nod or bow. A light, rather gentle grip is appropriate for handshakes. A very firm handshake may suggest aggression.

3.   Dual-language business cards are recommended and are offered with both hands grasped between thumb and forefingers. Your title or position should always be on the card. Upon receiving a card, read it carefully and keep it near you for future reference. Never casually toss it in a pocket or handbag.

4.   These cultures emphasize giving great respect to the elderly. To them, age is synonymous with wisdom and experience. Greet and speak to elders first, hold doors open for them, rise when they enter the room, give up your seat if need be, and remove glasses when addressing them.

5.   Asian cultures are punctual, formal, polite, and structured when it comes to business. The personal side of a business relationship and trust is extremely important, so relationships can take longer to develop.

6.   Good eye contact is appropriate, although it won’t be prolonged. Asian cultures often avert their eyes to avoid the intimidation that long, frequent eye contact might create.

7.   Many Asian cultures have large populations and it’s necessary to stand very close together on public transportation and in lines. However, they tend to stand farther apart than many other cultures when engaged in business interactions.

8.   These cultures are apt to be more process-oriented in business than many Western cultures, which tend to be more results-oriented. In Asian cultures, the style and how something is done is equally as important as what is done.

9.   Politeness, humility, patience, harmony, and grace are appreciated and respected. Avoid using any excessively demonstrative behavior or raising your voice too loud.

10. These are not “touching” cultures, so avoid back patting, putting an arm around someone’s shoulders, hugs, and so on.

11. Posture and balance are very important. Avoid slouching or putting your feet on desks and chairs. While seated, it is customary to place the hands in the lap and not fidget or wiggle the legs.

12. Never cross your legs with the foot resting on the knee. It is considered disrespectful and may result in unintentionally pointing the sole of your shoe at someone. It is a serious insult to show the soles of your shoes in most of the Asian cultures.

13. When pointing to something, do so with an open hand rather than one or two fingers, because beckoning with the index is considered very rude. Do not snap your fingers, wink, whistle, or blow your nose in a handkerchief and put in a pocket or handbag.

14. These cultures prefer more indirect communication and hate to disappoint or disagree. As a result, they rarely say “no” directly. Instead they may say, “Maybe,” or “That could be difficult”—which usually means “no.”

15. Don’t be alarmed if there are frequent periods of silence in your dinner or business conversations; silence is a sign of politeness and contemplation.

16. The Asian cultures see patience as a virtue. Although decisions often come from the top, they are made by consensus after considerable discussion so often take longer.

17. Asian cultures are very careful to give group or team credit rather than taking personal credit, because it is rare that only one person is solely responsible for accomplishing something.

18. Avoid singling anyone out or causing any type of embarrassment, because this will result in loss of face. In Asian cultures, someone who has a “good face” (simply referred to as face) has a good reputation with his or her peers, business colleagues, and community. Having face is a bankable notion that is literally a statement of a person’s value.

19. Asian cultures are typically gift-giving cultures. The ritual of gift giving is typically more important than the value of the gift. Never give a clock, handkerchief, white flowers, scissors, or knives as a gift, because these have negative connotations associated with them.

20. There tend to be fewer young men or women in the higher levels of the business hierarchy in these cultures. Age is synonymous with wisdom, experience, rank, seniority, and loyalty when it comes to promotion.

21. When dining in these cultures, it’s best to follow the “When in Rome, do as the Romans” motto, because habits and customs vary greatly between the individual countries. Sharing meals is vital to building friendships and social relationships that foster trust and understanding in business relationships.

Gayle Cotton’s new book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 keys to Cross-Cultural Communication’ is published and now available wherever books are sold!

Bon Voyage!

Join us in the future for Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for PERU!

Author: Gayle Cotton, International Keynote Speaker & Cultural Expert

Order Gayle’s New Book: SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!

5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication

www.circlesofexcellence.com/blog

www.circlesofexcellence.com

US: 972-370-1300 

Check out our Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

Visit Gayle Cotton’s blog

Gayle’s new article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for HONG KONG!

Cross-Cultural Speaker & Author of Global Travel Tips

www.gaylecotton.com

Contact Circles Of Excellence for your company’s Corporate Training, Executive Coaching, and Professional Keynote Speakers. We work with companies of all sizes and industries, including 50 Fortune 500 companies. Our topics include Communication Skills, Cross-Cultural Communications, Customer Service, Diversity, Leadership & Management, Presentation Skills, Sales & Negotiations, Stress Management, Team Building and Time Management. Contact EMMY AWARD WINNER, Gayle Cotton for your next meeting or conference to help your business become more successful in today’s global business environment. Gayle is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Training & Executive Coaching. She travels worldwide as a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Her vast experience living and working abroad will entertain and inspire any audience with her fresh, unique and humorous approach to Cross-Cultural Communications!

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Global Etiquette – Cultural Tips to Keep in Mind for Any Culture!

Posted on March 22, 2013 by Comments are off

Global Etiquette – Cultural Tips to Keep in Mind for Any Culture! NSW_25BushPrince01

Cultural etiquette, politeness, and good manners are passed down through societies from generation to generation. Etiquette refers to the cultural guidelines for what is appropriate or inappropriate and polite or impolite. It gives a culture structure, integrity, grace, and finesse—all of which are uniquely adapted from one culture to another. Fortunately, simple business and social etiquette are often based on basic common sense. Although etiquette styles and fads may come and go, the fundamentals of global etiquette remain essentially the same.

The following tips on what to do and what to avoid will help you engage in successful global business and social interactions. They will help to avoid embarrassing faux pas and guide you toward establishing quality relationships and friendships.

Tips for what to do

  • Show respect. The most important of the global etiquette tips is to show respect for what is important to another person and his or her culture. Although cultural conditioning has deep roots, respect is universally understood—and is an essential step in bridging the cultural gap.
  • Show you care. Be proactive and learn about what’s important to the cultures you visit or interact with. This will help you win friendships and develop business relationships.
  • Strike a balance. Find the comfortable middle ground between your culture and that which you’re visiting or working with. No one expects you to be just like him or her, nor would that be congruent. Be yourself and adapt to develop rapport in a way that works for all concerned.
  • Know your geography. There is nothing more embarrassing than not knowing the exact location of the country you are visiting or the locality of its neighboring countries and surrounding areas!
  • Mind your manners. What is polite in one culture may not be considered so in another, so know your manners for the countries you visit.
  • Know how to address people. The practice of using first names, surnames, titles, university degrees, or religious designations varies from country to country, so learn what is appropriate.
  • Clearly enunciate and speak slower. Speak clearly and slightly slower—about 20 percent slower—when communicating across linguistic borders. There’s no need to speak louder— multilingual speakers may be cross-translating, but they aren’t deaf!
  • Define acronyms, slang, and jargon. Define, clarify, or eliminate any acronyms, abbreviations, slang, and jargon that other cultures may not understand or even worse —take literally.
  • Know the appropriate greetings. Greetings are as diverse as the cultures themselves. There are handshakes, kisses, hugs, and bows—and they come in all shapes and sizes.

Tips for what to avoid

  • Using rude hand gestures: Unless you are counting on your fingers, avoid any hand gestures that you think could be potentially offensive to other cultures so you don’t unintentionally offend someone.
  • Touching: Many cultures, including the U.S., southern European, and some Latin American cultures, are comfortable with back pats or having an arm, elbow, or shoulder touched. However, this might be uncomfortable and inappropriate for people from other cultures.
  • Appearing self-important: Although the United States is known to prize self-confidence and the entrepreneurial spirit, some cultures—including many in Europe and Asia—prefer a more humble, group-oriented approach in their communication style
  • Asking personal questions: When in doubt, it’s safest to wait to ask personal questions (about family, etc.) until someone poses these kinds of questions to you first.
  • Discussing religion: It’s safest to avoid touching on the topic of religion, unless the other person brings it up first. There is always a chance that religious prejudice could be a problem.
  • Discussing politics: It’s advisable to keep politics, global affairs, and even a country’s economic condition out of the conversation—again, unless the other person brings it up first.
  • Unintentionally causing embarrassment: People are embarrassed by different things in different cultures. Doing your research on the potentially embarrassing factors of specific cultures beforehand will help you avoid this.
  • Showing the soles of your shoes: This may seem like a strange one, but showing the sole of your shoe is offensive in many cultures, including the Middle East and parts of Asia.
  • Saying “no”: Many cultures, including the Asian and some Latin American cultures, consider saying “no” directly to be impolite.If pushed for a firm “no,” they will become very uncomfortable.

When it comes to cultural etiquette, no one expects perfection. Awareness is the first step in bridging the cultural gap. A little advance preparation and being observant will likely help you figure out most of what you need to know. If you enjoy working with or visiting other cultures, they are likely to enjoy the same with you!

Gayle Cotton’s Bestselling Book SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere! 5 keys to Cross-Cultural Communication’ is now available wherever books are sold!

Bon Voyage! 

Join us in the future for Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for PERU!

Author: Gayle Cotton, International Keynote Speaker & Cultural Expert

Order Gayle’s Bestselling Book: SAY Anything to Anyone, Anywhere!

5 Keys to Successful Cross-Cultural Communication

www.circlesofexcellence.com/blog

www.circlesofexcellence.com

US: 972-370-1300

Check out our Cultural Clues, Do’s and Taboos Articles Archive for countries you may have missed!

Visit Gayle Cotton’s blog

Gayle’s new article: Cultural Clues, Do’s & Taboos for HONG KONG!

Cross-Cultural Speaker & Author of Global Travel Tips

www.gaylecotton.com

Contact Circles Of Excellence for your company’s Corporate Training, Executive Coaching, and Professional Keynote Speakers. We work with companies of all sizes and industries, including 50 Fortune 500 companies. Our topics include Communication Skills, Cross-Cultural Communications, Customer Service, Diversity, Leadership & Management, Presentation Skills, Sales & Negotiations, Stress Management, Team Building and Time Management. Contact EMMY AWARD WINNER, Gayle Cotton for your next meeting or conference to help your business become more successful in today’s global business environment. Gayle is President of Circles Of Excellence for Corporate Training & Executive Coaching. She travels worldwide as a distinguished Professional Keynote Speaker. Her vast experience living and working abroad will entertain and inspire any audience with her fresh, unique and humorous approach to Cross-Cultural Communications!

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